#18 Bohae Bokbungja-ju (보해 복분자주)

Bokbunjajoo is a fortified wine made from fermented black raspberries which give it it’s dark purple colour and obvious fruity smell. Made by Jeollanam-do’s Bohae Brewery, who boast almost 70 yrs of tradition, it is sweet without being overly sickly and did in fact win a silver medal for flavour at the international wine awards back in 2005. Coming from near Glasgow I am of course used to “fortified wines” and although far easier to drink than a bottle of Buckfast I can’t see me convincing the boys down the local park to switch allegiances anytime soon! Continue reading #18 Bohae Bokbungja-ju (보해 복분자주)

#17 Hapcheon Makkoli (합전 막걸리)

Hapcheon Makgeolli hails from South Gyeongsang and has a pretty tangy and slightly bitter flavour which can be slightly overpowering the first sip or so. Like most makgeolli from the area, Hapcheon is pretty sour if you are more used to brands such as Seoul Jangsoo or Busan Seangtak (review here) and it does explain why the locals are famous for adding Sprite to their kettles! It’s unpasteurized and as such has roughly around a 1mth ‘fridge life’. Continue reading #17 Hapcheon Makkoli (합전 막걸리)

#16 InSaeng (Life) Makgeolli (인생막걸리)

Produced by the Seoul Jangsoo Company, In Saeng, or “life”, makgeolli is the latest product from www.koreawine.co.kr . It comes in 3 varieties with the ‘Basic’ option being the most readily available in your convenience store of choice.  It is pretty heavily carbonated so make sure to open it over the top of your cup as otherwise you’ll be soaking the table with more than just your tears at the sight of spilled rice wine. It has a smooth texture and isn’t as chalky as some others which makes it perfect for that after-hike drink. Continue reading #16 InSaeng (Life) Makgeolli (인생막걸리)

#15 Goheung Citrus Makgeolli (고흥 유자 막걸리)

With thinly sliced sugared citron (4%) added during fermentation Goheung Citron Makgeolli makes you almost feel as if you are drinking orange juice and it kind of reminded me a little of a less-sugary Sunny D. Unlike some of the other ‘fruit makgeollis’ on the market the tang of the citron is not limited to smell alone and continues to linger in the mouth after the makgeolli has gone down. It’s refreshing to drink and is definitely one that you could imagine downing copious amounts of outside a summer CU…..trust me I’ve tried it.

Continue reading #15 Goheung Citrus Makgeolli (고흥 유자 막걸리)

#14 Horangi “Draft” Makgeolli (호랑이 생 막걸리)

    

Horangi, which quite literally translates as ‘Tiger’, is definitely one of my favorite makgeollis and is one of the first I look for on the menu. It falls on the sweeter end of the spectrum and is definitely the choice for those of you out there with a sweeter tooth. It is pretty smooth to drink with quite a creamy texture without being too heavy. It also has a slightly tangy taste which makes it one of the easiest rice wines to drink. The labeling has a drawing of a guitar playing tiger which accompanied by it’s red bottle cap and red writing make it quite recognizable among those on the shelves. Horangi is also available in a ‘non-draft’ version which comes in a glass bottle and is sightly stronger.  Continue reading #14 Horangi “Draft” Makgeolli (호랑이 생 막걸리)

#10 Jipyeong Makgeolli (지평 막걸리)

As commonly found in local marts these days as Cass and Hite, Jipyeong Makgeolli is fast becoming one of the most easily recognizable as well as most consumed rice wines around. This popularity could be down to the labeling on the bottle which sets the drinker up to believe that they are about to have one of the finest makgeollis on the market.  Boasts of the brewery dating back to 1925, making it the oldest distillery in Korea, give it that “traditional” feeling with years of craftsmanship filling every bottle.  Add to that the claim of their makgeolli only being made with Yangpyeong water, famed for its purity allegedly, and you could be forgiven for thinking this was going to be akin to the finest of Single Malt whiskies. Continue reading #10 Jipyeong Makgeolli (지평 막걸리)

#8 Gapyeong Makgeolli (가평 막걸리)

A slightly pine nut infused makgeolli, hence the “잣” subtly placed on the label, produced by the Woori Sool company who proudly boast having “produced the first pasteurized rice wine in the world”. Woori Sool claim to use only 100% domestic ingredients and, as the label states, use Gapyeong water and pine nuts mixed with Gyeonggi-do rice to create their entry-level makgeolli. As readily available in Seoul E-Marts as long queues and kimchi-hawking ajummas, Gapyeong Makgeolli provides a great alternative to Seoul Jangsoo or something similarly tasteless. Continue reading #8 Gapyeong Makgeolli (가평 막걸리)

#7 Jeju Baengnokdam Ale (제주 백록담)

Named after Jeju’s famous Baengnokdam Lake which sits atop Hallasan Mountain, this ale is one of a few craft beers that have made their way Seoulside from Korea’s island paradise of late. Brewed by the Jeju Jungmun Brewery, Baengnokdam is a ‘Whitbeer’ style ale with a particularly fruity aftertaste which lingers almost as long as last night’s BBQ smoke. Continue reading #7 Jeju Baengnokdam Ale (제주 백록담)

#6 Cheoeum-Cheoreom Soju (처음처럼 소주)

Produced by the Lotte Chilsung company, Cheoeum-cheoreom actually means “like the first time” in Korean which is ironic as pretty much anything you do after about the 2nd bottle will almost certainly be forgotten the next day. It’s actually made with alkali water which gives it a more distinctive taste than the other mainstream Sojus available, and has given lend to the advertising slogan ‘Happy Water’. As common on a Korean BBQ table as a red face, Cheoeun-cheoreom is an integral part of many a meal with some preferring to ‘take it down’ on it’s own and others masking its taste in a glass of beer (somek).

Continue reading #6 Cheoeum-Cheoreom Soju (처음처럼 소주)

#5 Pocheon Chapsal DongDongJu ( 포천 찹쌀 동동주)

Brewed in Pocheon, a small city located in the mountains of the North East of Gyeonggi-do this Dongdongju is probably not going to become famous over night despite it’s exuberant export to Seoul’s local supermarkets. It is marketed as a ‘sweet rice wine’ and it’s good to know that the Marketing team had tasted their product before coming up with a tagline as “sweet” was definitely the first word that crossed my mind, with bland and watery being close seconds! Continue reading #5 Pocheon Chapsal DongDongJu ( 포천 찹쌀 동동주)