#14 Horangi “Draft” Makgeolli (호랑이 생 막걸리)

    

Horangi, which quite literally translates as ‘Tiger’, is definitely one of my favorite makgeollis and is one of the first I look for on the menu. It falls on the sweeter end of the spectrum and is definitely the choice for those of you out there with a sweeter tooth. It is pretty smooth to drink with quite a creamy texture without being too heavy. It also has a slightly tangy taste which makes it one of the easiest rice wines to drink. The labeling has a drawing of a guitar playing tiger which accompanied by it’s red bottle cap and red writing make it quite recognizable among those on the shelves. Horangi is also available in a ‘non-draft’ version which comes in a glass bottle and is sightly stronger.  Continue reading #14 Horangi “Draft” Makgeolli (호랑이 생 막걸리)

#10 Jipyeong Makgeolli (지평 막걸리)

As commonly found in local marts these days as Cass and Hite, Jipyeong Makgeolli is fast becoming one of the most easily recognizable as well as most consumed rice wines around. This popularity could be down to the labeling on the bottle which sets the drinker up to believe that they are about to have one of the finest makgeollis on the market.  Boasts of the brewery dating back to 1925, making it the oldest distillery in Korea, give it that “traditional” feeling with years of craftsmanship filling every bottle.  Add to that the claim of their makgeolli only being made with Yangpyeong water, famed for its purity allegedly, and you could be forgiven for thinking this was going to be akin to the finest of Single Malt whiskies. Continue reading #10 Jipyeong Makgeolli (지평 막걸리)

#8 Gapyeong Makgeolli (가평 막걸리)

A slightly pine nut infused makgeolli, hence the “잣” subtly placed on the label, produced by the Woori Sool company who proudly boast having “produced the first pasteurized rice wine in the world”. Woori Sool claim to use only 100% domestic ingredients and, as the label states, use Gapyeong water and pine nuts mixed with Gyeonggi-do rice to create their entry-level makgeolli. As readily available in Seoul E-Marts as long queues and kimchi-hawking ajummas, Gapyeong Makgeolli provides a great alternative to Seoul Jangsoo or something similarly tasteless. Continue reading #8 Gapyeong Makgeolli (가평 막걸리)

#5 Pocheon Chapsal DongDongJu ( 포천 찹쌀 동동주)

Brewed in Pocheon, a small city located in the mountains of the North East of Gyeonggi-do this Dongdongju is probably not going to become famous over night despite it’s exuberant export to Seoul’s local supermarkets. It is marketed as a ‘sweet rice wine’ and it’s good to know that the Marketing team had tasted their product before coming up with a tagline as “sweet” was definitely the first word that crossed my mind, with bland and watery being close seconds! Continue reading #5 Pocheon Chapsal DongDongJu ( 포천 찹쌀 동동주)

#2 Busan Seangtak Makgeolli (생탁 막걸리)

Busan, Korea’s second largest city, is probably more well-known for it’s raw fish, baseball team and bustling film industry but it also provides a wide array of alcoholic beverages to quench the thirst after a long day on Haeundae Beach! It’s ‘generic’ makgeolli, Seang Tak, certainly beats it’s Seoul rival but then again most things would. Perfect after a long day ‘hiking’ the trails around Beomeosa Temple it certainly hits the spot, especially when accompanied with some pa-jeon (파전)!

For my video review click here

Continue reading #2 Busan Seangtak Makgeolli (생탁 막걸리)