#44 Busan Ssal Tak Makgeolli (부산 쌀탁 막걸리)

Produced by the Busan Sanseong Brewery,  Ssal Tak lacks the bite of some of the brewery’s other offerings which, in my opinion, rank among some of the best. The first gulp actually has a decent enough taste, if a little sweet, but it lacks the body of a ‘top 10’ rice wine and ends up feeling quite thin and watery. It’s far from being a terrible makgeolli and if it was as readily available as a Jangsoo or Saeng Tak then all could be forgiven but unfortunately it is quite difficult to locate and in all honesty it struggles to be worth the pursuit unless you enjoy being the Indiana Jones of Makgeolli hunting. Continue reading #44 Busan Ssal Tak Makgeolli (부산 쌀탁 막걸리)

#33 Dongrae San Seong Makgeolli (동래산성 막걸리)

With it’s elaborate Chinese lettering label Dongrae San Seong Makgeolli is one of Busan’s lesser known rice wines, so much so that it took me almost six trips nine months apart to get my hands on another bottle. They tend to change their label design pretty often which can make it appear even more elusive. Like most Busan offerings it has a slightly sour/bitter taste and has more of a bite to it than it’s Seoul competitors. It has a shelf-life or around a month due to being non-pasteurized so make sure your calendar, or fridge, isn’t too full. Continue reading #33 Dongrae San Seong Makgeolli (동래산성 막걸리)

#2 Busan Seangtak Makgeolli (생탁 막걸리)

Busan, Korea’s second largest city, is probably more well-known for it’s raw fish, baseball team and bustling film industry but it also provides a wide array of alcoholic beverages to quench the thirst after a long day on Haeundae Beach! It’s ‘generic’ makgeolli, Seang Tak, certainly beats it’s Seoul rival but then again most things would. Perfect after a long day ‘hiking’ the trails around Beomeosa Temple it certainly hits the spot, especially when accompanied with some pa-jeon (파전)!

For my video review click here

Continue reading #2 Busan Seangtak Makgeolli (생탁 막걸리)