#22 Song Myeong Seob Makgeolli (송명섭이 직접 빚은 막걸리)

Seen by many a ‘connoisseur’ as the “peak” of makgeollis due to it having no, or very few, additives Song Myeong Seob Makgeolli has a sour and bitter taste with a slightly watery body. Very similar in taste to Gaedo Makgelli (review here) but definitely a lot lighter and probably easier to drink. Song Myong Seob generally comes in 900ml bottles as opposed to 750ml which is ideal as once you crack open that lid and taste that first sip it does kind of leave you wanting more. Continue reading #22 Song Myeong Seob Makgeolli (송명섭이 직접 빚은 막걸리)

#21 Bong Pyeong Buckwheat Makgeolli (봉평메밀 막걸리)

Bong Pyeong Buckwheat makgeolli, as the name would suggest, is made from buckwheat which makes up 5% of the total ingredients. This 5%, unfortunately, doesn’t really go a long way to adding a whole lot of body or indeed flavour to the drink. It tends to be a little watery  and lacks the thicker consistency of other readily available rice wines. Despite not being the most flavourable of makgeollis it still has a slightly bitter after taste which tends to linger a little too long in the mouth. Continue reading #21 Bong Pyeong Buckwheat Makgeolli (봉평메밀 막걸리)

#20 Gaedo Makgeolli (개도 막걸리)

Hailing from the small island of Gaedo, which is part of the Dadohaehaesang National Marine Park off the coast of Yeosu, this sour tasting rice wine is definitely one of the most distinctive tasting makgeolli I have had. It is pretty chalky and is not one to be left too long in the cup as it settles quite quickly soon after pouring. It has an incredibly sour first taste and will definitely draw in the jaws of even the most hardened of makgeolli drinkers. It does sweeten a little after that first mouthful or two. Continue reading #20 Gaedo Makgeolli (개도 막걸리)

#17 Hapcheon Makkoli (합전 막걸리)

Hapcheon Makgeolli hails from South Gyeongsang and has a pretty tangy and slightly bitter flavour which can be slightly overpowering the first sip or so. Like most makgeolli from the area, Hapcheon is pretty sour if you are more used to brands such as Seoul Jangsoo or Busan Seangtak (review here) and it does explain why the locals are famous for adding Sprite to their kettles! It’s unpasteurized and as such has roughly around a 1mth ‘fridge life’. Continue reading #17 Hapcheon Makkoli (합전 막걸리)

#16 InSaeng (Life) Makgeolli (인생막걸리)

Produced by the Seoul Jangsoo Company, In Saeng, or “life”, makgeolli is the latest product from www.koreawine.co.kr . It comes in 3 varieties with the ‘Basic’ option being the most readily available in your convenience store of choice.  It is pretty heavily carbonated so make sure to open it over the top of your cup as otherwise you’ll be soaking the table with more than just your tears at the sight of spilled rice wine. It has a smooth texture and isn’t as chalky as some others which makes it perfect for that after-hike drink. Continue reading #16 InSaeng (Life) Makgeolli (인생막걸리)

#15 Goheung Citrus Makgeolli (고흥 유자 막걸리)

With thinly sliced sugared citron (4%) added during fermentation Goheung Citron Makgeolli makes you almost feel as if you are drinking orange juice and it kind of reminded me a little of a less-sugary Sunny D. Unlike some of the other ‘fruit makgeollis’ on the market the tang of the citron is not limited to smell alone and continues to linger in the mouth after the makgeolli has gone down. It’s refreshing to drink and is definitely one that you could imagine downing copious amounts of outside a summer CU…..trust me I’ve tried it.

Continue reading #15 Goheung Citrus Makgeolli (고흥 유자 막걸리)

#14 Horangi “Draft” Makgeolli (호랑이 생 막걸리)

    

Horangi, which quite literally translates as ‘Tiger’, is definitely one of my favorite makgeollis and is one of the first I look for on the menu. It falls on the sweeter end of the spectrum and is definitely the choice for those of you out there with a sweeter tooth. It is pretty smooth to drink with quite a creamy texture without being too heavy. It also has a slightly tangy taste which makes it one of the easiest rice wines to drink. The labeling has a drawing of a guitar playing tiger which accompanied by it’s red bottle cap and red writing make it quite recognizable among those on the shelves. Horangi is also available in a ‘non-draft’ version which comes in a glass bottle and is sightly stronger.  Continue reading #14 Horangi “Draft” Makgeolli (호랑이 생 막걸리)

#12 Jeju Udo Peanut Makgeolli (우도 땅콩 막걸리)

Hailing from Jeju’s Udo Island this peanut makgeolli is one of those types of drink that tastes better in your head than in reality. Jeju might be famous for producing great oranges, healthy mineral water and the best Soju around but it’s safe to say that this island product is not going to be winning any food and drink awards any time soon. Although it does taste exactly like peanuts it has an overpowering sweetness that brought memories of that sweet peanut candy my mother used to buy me to shut me up back in the 80s.

Continue reading #12 Jeju Udo Peanut Makgeolli (우도 땅콩 막걸리)

#10 Jipyeong Makgeolli (지평 막걸리)

As commonly found in local marts these days as Cass and Hite, Jipyeong Makgeolli is fast becoming one of the most easily recognizable as well as most consumed rice wines around. This popularity could be down to the labeling on the bottle which sets the drinker up to believe that they are about to have one of the finest makgeollis on the market.  Boasts of the brewery dating back to 1925, making it the oldest distillery in Korea, give it that “traditional” feeling with years of craftsmanship filling every bottle.  Add to that the claim of their makgeolli only being made with Yangpyeong water, famed for its purity allegedly, and you could be forgiven for thinking this was going to be akin to the finest of Single Malt whiskies. Continue reading #10 Jipyeong Makgeolli (지평 막걸리)

#9 Albam DongDong ( 알밤동동)

Another well-crafted product from the boys at Woori Sool who brought us Gapyeong’s pine-nut rice wines. This time they’ve served up a chestnut DongDong-ju with a rich, creamy texture making it dangerously easy and addictive to drink whilst halfway up your favorite mountain.  Generally easy to find in most CUs dotted around Seoul it’s accessibility and easy on the palette taste make it a great choice for those less familiar of the joys of Korean rice wine as some of the other less sweet selections out there can leave a bad taste in the mouth in more ways than one. Continue reading #9 Albam DongDong ( 알밤동동)