#25 Taehwaro Makgeolli (태화루 막걸리)

Boasting over 50yrs of brewing craftsmanship, Taehwaro (태화루) would appear to be the favourite makgeolli among the locals of Ulsan. It is a little similar in body to Busan’s Seangtak (review here) although it does earn a 2nd place when it comes to taste comparisons. Taehwaro has a rather mild taste and while not bland it wouldn’t hold it’s own in a makgeolli “Pepsi challenge”.  Taehwaro also only comes in at 5.5% alcohol content which might explain why Ulsan is the powerhouse of Korean industry with some of the largest factories in the world and the country’s least hungover employees. Continue reading #25 Taehwaro Makgeolli (태화루 막걸리)

#24 Wooryung E Ssal Makgeolli (우렁이쌀 막걸리)

Made by the Yangchon Brewery in Nonsan,  Wooryung E Ssal has little to no carbonation which is ideal as after a couple of hours in the refrigerator it begins to separate and needs to be well shaken before drinking. It comes in at a little higher on the ‘luxury’ end of the makgeolli spectrum and has a beautifully designed bottle with it’s easily recognizable red taping covering the lid. It is definitely a rice wine to be drank when you have time to spend as it deserves to be savored and not gulped down like a Jangsu. Continue reading #24 Wooryung E Ssal Makgeolli (우렁이쌀 막걸리)

#23 Busan Dongbaek Makgeolli (부산 동백 막걸리)

Brewed by the Dongbaek Yangjo Brewery who also make a tomato makgeolli, yip that’s not a mistake, Busan Dongbaek Makgeolli is a light and refreshing rice wine that is dangerously easy to drink. It’s the kind of drink that you could easily drink a few bottles in a beer garden on a sunny day. It isn’t carbonated and so you can feel free to shake away, which is good as it takes a little while to fully mix.

Continue reading #23 Busan Dongbaek Makgeolli (부산 동백 막걸리)

#22 Song Myeong Seob Makgeolli (송명섭이 직접 빚은 막걸리)

Seen by many a ‘connoisseur’ as the “peak” of makgeollis due to it having no, or very few, additives Song Myeong Seob Makgeolli has a sour and bitter taste with a slightly watery body. Very similar in taste to Gaedo Makgelli (review here) but definitely a lot lighter and probably easier to drink. Song Myong Seob generally comes in 900ml bottles as opposed to 750ml which is ideal as once you crack open that lid and taste that first sip it does kind of leave you wanting more. Continue reading #22 Song Myeong Seob Makgeolli (송명섭이 직접 빚은 막걸리)

#21 Bong Pyeong Buckwheat Makgeolli (봉평메밀 막걸리)

Bong Pyeong Buckwheat makgeolli, as the name would suggest, is made from buckwheat which makes up 5% of the total ingredients. This 5%, unfortunately, doesn’t really go a long way to adding a whole lot of body or indeed flavour to the drink. It tends to be a little watery  and lacks the thicker consistency of other readily available rice wines. Despite not being the most flavourable of makgeollis it still has a slightly bitter after taste which tends to linger a little too long in the mouth. Continue reading #21 Bong Pyeong Buckwheat Makgeolli (봉평메밀 막걸리)

#20 Gaedo Makgeolli (개도 막걸리)

Hailing from the small island of Gaedo, which is part of the Dadohaehaesang National Marine Park off the coast of Yeosu, this sour tasting rice wine is definitely one of the most distinctive tasting makgeolli I have had. It is pretty chalky and is not one to be left too long in the cup as it settles quite quickly soon after pouring. It has an incredibly sour first taste and will definitely draw in the jaws of even the most hardened of makgeolli drinkers. It does sweeten a little after that first mouthful or two. Continue reading #20 Gaedo Makgeolli (개도 막걸리)

#19 Han River Ale (한강)

Made by Korean craft beer company 7brau (see website here), Han River Ale is brewed as a witbier with an “citrus taste”. The citrus taste comes from the added orange peel sediment in the bottle so don’t make the same schoolboy error I did and drink the first few gulps without shaking it first as it really does change the flavour. The label claims that it also has oats added but that wasn’t particularly evident in the taste. It has the typically lemmon-ish colour of most witbiers but without the overpowering sourness so commonly found with them. Continue reading #19 Han River Ale (한강)

#18 Bohae Bokbungja-ju (보해 복분자주)

Bokbunjajoo is a fortified wine made from fermented black raspberries which give it it’s dark purple colour and obvious fruity smell. Made by Jeollanam-do’s Bohae Brewery, who boast almost 70 yrs of tradition, it is sweet without being overly sickly and did in fact win a silver medal for flavour at the international wine awards back in 2005. Coming from near Glasgow I am of course used to “fortified wines” and although far easier to drink than a bottle of Buckfast I can’t see me convincing the boys down the local park to switch allegiances anytime soon! Continue reading #18 Bohae Bokbungja-ju (보해 복분자주)

#17 Hapcheon Makkoli (합전 막걸리)

Hapcheon Makgeolli hails from South Gyeongsang and has a pretty tangy and slightly bitter flavour which can be slightly overpowering the first sip or so. Like most makgeolli from the area, Hapcheon is pretty sour if you are more used to brands such as Seoul Jangsoo or Busan Seangtak (review here) and it does explain why the locals are famous for adding Sprite to their kettles! It’s unpasteurized and as such has roughly around a 1mth ‘fridge life’. Continue reading #17 Hapcheon Makkoli (합전 막걸리)

#16 InSaeng (Life) Makgeolli (인생막걸리)

Produced by the Seoul Jangsoo Company, In Saeng, or “life”, makgeolli is the latest product from www.koreawine.co.kr . It comes in 3 varieties with the ‘Basic’ option being the most readily available in your convenience store of choice.  It is pretty heavily carbonated so make sure to open it over the top of your cup as otherwise you’ll be soaking the table with more than just your tears at the sight of spilled rice wine. It has a smooth texture and isn’t as chalky as some others which makes it perfect for that after-hike drink. Continue reading #16 InSaeng (Life) Makgeolli (인생막걸리)